Archive for the Real Estate Category

Ali Home For Sale

Posted in Development, Economics, Louisville History, Louisville News, Real Estate, Sports with tags , , , , , on August 27, 2012 by othersideoflife


(Picture of Muhammad Ali’s boyhood home from the Courier-Journal.)

The Courier-Journal is reporting that Muhammad Ali’s boyhood home in West Louisville is now for sale:

Two “for sale” signs have popped up in the front yard of the small white house on Grand Avenue where boxing great Muhammad Ali — known in those days as Cassius Clay — grew in western Louisville.

The home, which was recognized as Ali’s boyhood home with a historical marker in May, is described by the plaque as the place “where young Clay’s values were instilled.”

The sale price of the house was not listed on the for sale signs and a message left at the number listed was not returned. The Jefferson County Property Valuation Administration values the property at $23,260.

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer said Sunday that it is too early to know what role the city might have as the house is sold, but he plans to be involved in the process in some way. He even hinted at the possibility that the home could be transformed into more of a tourist attraction.

“I would hope that we would find some reasonable way to make (the house) a part of our history here where people can visit more formally than they do right now,” he said. “The city would be interested in making sure that it falls into the right hands and there’s a partnership there in some way.”

Sounds like a bargain, that despite the home’s historical significance, it needs some work. Here’s hoping that, if it ends up being bought by a private party, the proper renovations will be carried out and, at some point, it could help drive tourism to an otherwise-overlooked part of the city.

UPDATE, 8/28/2012: The Courier-Journal has published an updated story on the Ali Home, with some interesting new details. First, apparently Ali’s family isn’t interested in buying the home:

The 1920 one-story at 3302 Grand Ave. in western Louisville, appraised at $23,260, is in such bad condition that “we probably would not be interested in buying it,” said Lonnie Ali, the wife of the three-time heavyweight boxing champion.

“It would be nice if someone were interested,” she said in an interview Tuesday, adding that she feared that any hint of the family being a potential buyer would drive up the price. “It is going to be a very important piece of real estate for Louisville and as a tourist attraction.”

According to the Ali Center, an anonymous donor is interested, but with no more information to divulge.  Additionally, check out the last sale price of the house, from 1998:

The house, which was last sold in 1998 for $2,500, is owned by a Southern Indiana couple, Steve and Kassandra Stephenson, according the Jefferson County PVA website. Their asking price couldn’t be determined.

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The Mammoth Profiled By a Dinosaur

Posted in Art, Development, Economics, Happenings, Louisville News, Media, Music, Real Estate with tags , , on August 6, 2012 by othersideoflife


(photo of Hallie Jones and Aron Conaway from the Courier-Journal.)

Okay, so the snarky headline was too good to pass up. In yesterday’s Courier-Journal, there was an excellent, and expansive, profile of The Mammoth, the behemoth multi-use arts space in Louisville’s Park Hill neighborhood, run by Aron Conaway and Hallie Jones:

Now, with this three-story, 90,000-square-foot building — where Conaway and Jones live on the first floor — and another attached building with 36,000 square feet, the couple are poised to see their dream become a reality.

They’re looking to convert this space, which they now call The Mammoth, into art studios and artists’ residences, an art installation space and art gallery, an independent media center, band practice spaces, a live music venue, film-viewing space and even community gardens and other green spaces.

The idea is to have enough space for artists to have the privacy to work on their own, but also shared space to work together. It includes outfitting the space with equipment for making art.

The plan includes artists pooling their resources and generating income for the endeavor though sideline businesses and eventually renting space to commercial businesses. The couple envisions a nonprofit entity overseeing the shared art-making spaces.

While we haven’t yet been to The Mammoth, we’re excited about it. Read more here.

Dolls Market Sale Pending — And We’re Back

Posted in Development, Economics, Louisville News, Real Estate with tags , , on July 24, 2012 by stateofthecommonwealth


(Photo of the former Dolls Market swiped from the Courier-Journal.)

According to today’s Courier-Journal, the former Dolls Market on Brownsboro Road will soon have a new owner:

An out-of-town developer has a contract to buy the former Doll’s Market building and parking lot on Brownsboro Road for a retail use, and a closing is expected by the end of the year, real estate agent Paul Grisanti said.

The building could be one store or perhaps three smaller ones, but Grisanti said he could not disclose details because of a confidentiality agreement. Grisanti is selling the property for the owners, the Charles F. Bauer family.

The developer interested in the Doll’s building has 53 “units” in 13 states, and this would be the first store in Kentucky, Grisanti said. “It’s something people in that area will most likely appreciate,” he said.

We figured we’d google “53 stores 13 states retail” to see if there we could find any hints, but the only relevant result was the Wikipedia entry for American Signature, the parent company of Value City. Not that exciting, we know. Perhaps someone out there has a tip they can share with us? Anyway, it will be good for that stretch of Brownsboro Road to have more robust retail again. Now if only they can get a good restaurant back in the old Azalea space…

In other not-really-news news, we’re restarting State of the Commonwealth on a most-likely sporadic basis, so we hope you enjoy it. Work schedules now allow for some time to dedicate to SotC, which we haven’t updated since 2008. We’ve unfortunately missed out on a lot of changes, some positive and some otherwise, around Louisville and Kentucky in the past three years, and we regret that. But hopefully we can jump back into the swing of things! Thanks for reading.